Monthly Archives: September 2012

9/27/12: Foooooooiiiiiiillllllllll

Went to another Magic2013 draft tonight. Drafted a blue/black removal+evasion deck. Pretty handily creamed my opponent the first game, got schelacked the second game, and lost the third due to terrible play on my part. After we determined the winner of that game we played some for fun and crushed him three times in a row. Wish I had had those wins earlier!

Anyway, rares i drafted weren’t bad. Heres the breakdown:

 

Xathrid Gorgon: $0.37

Captain of the Watch: $1.00

*FOIL* Sands of Delirium: ~$2.00

So only about $3.50 from rares. Not to crazy about that. Saved again by valuable uncommons like Talrand’s Invocation, Oblivion Ring,  Fog Bank, and Jace’s Phantasm save the financial day.

Here is an interesting podcast for those looking to play Return to Ravnica (particularly limited).

http://www.mtgcast.com/mtgcast-podcast-shows/active-podcast-shows/limited-resources/limited-resources-150-return-to-ravnica-limited-set-review-show-commons-and-uncommons

Looooooooooong as podcast about the strength of commons and uncommons. Worth listening to.

 

Speaking of Return to Ravnica, I will be attending 3 pre-releases this weekend. So expect a large post early next week recapping the events.

 

9/23/2012: Drudge Skeletons in the Closet

Special Note: Thanks to my talented friend Tucker, I not have an image properly displaying the feeling I was trying to convey with last weeks entry. Again, a special thanks to my friend Tucker whose artwork you can see by visiting his site.  So without further ado…

When I started my quest to collect all these cards, I knew that simply buying all the cards I needed would be A) incredibly expensive and B) no fun. This posed the problem that cards from old sets, particularly Alpha/Beta/Arabian Nights/Antiquities, was going to be particularly expensive because those sets had smaller print runs than modern prints and that since most of those expansions were printed 20 years ago, many that were printed have been destroyed or are in a condition that will be unacceptable for my collection. How will I over come these difficulties? I have thought of a few different scenarios that would benefit me. The ideal purchase I make is from some old woman who is selling their son’s old collection that he has forgot about and she does not know what she has. Beyond fantastic scenarios like that, collecting old cards becomes hard.

But sometimes you get a break. My brother-in-law used to play magic back in the mid 90s. When I mentioned my quest he offered up his old cards. Knowing that he played a while ago, I was excited to crack open his old collection and look through it. I was not disappointed.

First off, there were many cool cards with not huge financial value like Arcades Sabboth and Palladia-Mors  from Chronicles. Both of which I will be making an EDH (Elder Dragon Highlander) deck for. Those two cards in addition to another three from Legends are the namesake Elder Dragons of that format.

Second, there were some powerful and expensive cards in there. Some standouts include Mana Vaults from Revised and 4th edition, Nevinyrral’s Disk, as well as the old staples of White, Balance and Swords to Plowshares.

Third, and most excitedly, there was a collection  of cards from Alpha. Now there weren’t any Moxes, Black Lotuses, or Dual Lands, but I did get many commons and uncommons from the set. The card I am most excited about is the Alpha Dark Ritual. It is a card worth a decent haul (about 30 bucks) and once sleeved is a card I can get a lot of us out of.

I’m not going to post all the rares and do a regular breakdown of the collection, simply because it is too large. I did go to Magic2013 draft on Thursday and can give a breakdown about the rares I got there. Heres the breakdown:

As always, prices are based off average price on TCGPlayer.

Serra Avenger:     $1.69

Fervor:     $0.43

Elderscale Wurm:  $2.85

Total Value of Rares:  $4.97

The draft had a rare redraft at the end. I picked the Wurm because he is a Mythic and the rarity trumped the value of the other cards I could pick from. My final pick was the Fervor. Not something I would normally pick, but since I got one at Magic Celebration I figured that a second would be good towards completing a playset of them. For the $8 I spent on entry for the draft I am feeling pretty good about the return on my investment. Reliquary Tower alone helps bring that total close to $8 before all the other rares and uncommons. I will probably attend the same draft again this Thursday.

This coming weekend I will be going to a couple of Return to Ravnica prerelease events, so look for an update about my haul and record there.

Saturday 9/8/2012: Stupid Sexy Sentinel Spider

Long time no post. Luckily I have much to post about. I will start with my experience at Magic Celebration on September 8th and will follow this shortly with two posts about some more card finds I had.

Magic Celebration was September 8th and was help in many locations all over. I went to my former Friendly Local Game Store (FLGS) in Delaware, Days of Knights. For those who were unaware, the format of Magic Celebration was as follows. You are given 3 of each basic land (15 cards total) and are given a single booster pack of Magic 2013. You shuffle the entire booster together with your 15 lands to make a deck of 30 completely random cards. This is about as limited as Magic gets. The format was exciting since you had no idea what your deck consisted of. The format also underlines the difference in skill quality between players. With such limited cards and an unknown deck, any decision, no matter  how small is very important.

After the first round, the winner receives another booster pack. From this round forward, players were allowed to construct their deck with the cards they got between the two booster packs. The only restriction was that the deck had to be a minimum of forty cards. With so few cards (15 basic lands, 30 random cards from boosters) there are few decisions to make when constructing your deck. Every subsequent round the winner would receive a new booster and continue refining their deck, until they made it to the top of their bracket. Getting to the top and winning the final round usually resulted in a booster pack as a prize.

The boosters that were used were supplied by Wizards of the Coast and most stores ran a single-elimination tournament, with the winners receiving the free booster packs. At the store I went to the losers were allowed to enter a losers bracket and continue playing and receiving free booster packs. Thing was above and beyond what I could have suspected. It created a fun atmosphere for all involved, even for the players who would normally be knocked out the first round.

My first round I drew and excellent rare, but the booster pack was weak overall. Akroma’s Memorial provides your creatures with excellent keywords and abilities, but if your creatures do not have much power or toughness to back it up, the keywords are wasted. My opponent drew stronger creatures than I including the namesake of this entry. After two quick loses I found myself in a loser’s bracket. Round Two went well. I grabbed a victory my first game thanks to these two guys. I lost the second game due to constant attacks from flyers and my inability to get out Silklash Spider. Third game I won handily thanks to Vedalken Entrancer decking my opponent. My second opponent was a pretty cool guy, giving the the cards from his booster pack after winning, since he didn’t collect magic cards, but just played. Third game I again went 2-1, destroying my opponent with larger creatures like these two brutes. My final round I went 1-2. The final round was quite a nail biter, with my opponent gradually wearing my down with Staff of Nin. The booster my opponent won did not contain any particularly expensive cards, so I wasn’t let down by the close loss. Heres the breakdown of what I won:

 

As always, prices are the medium price listed at tcgplayer.com (on the sideboard) ————>

Akroma’s Memorial: $5.52

Silklash Spider: $0.55

Fervor: $0.45

Hamletback Goliath: $0.34

Mutilate: $3.28

Total Spent: $0

Approximate Retail Value of Rares: $10.14

All in all I had an excellent time at Magic Celebration. I would love to try that format again. The uncertainty of what you will be playing with is quite exciting, but I can see why it would not appeal to some people. It is also a format I would not want to do everyday.

Till next time